Evidence of a Flood

In this gallery, we see evidence for flood deposition and rapid erosion in the geological topography. There are erosional features that can only have been produced by rapid water erosion. There are deposition features which show that the sediments were all water-borne. The nature of the depositions, their grading, and the unconformities therein are consistent with flood deposition but not with standard geological paradigms.

<p>Fossil ammonites buried in a mass grave. Only catastrophoc burial can account for such a large-scale burial.</p>
Fossil ammonites buried in a mass grave. Only catastrophoc burial can account for such a large-scale burial.
<p>These flat coal seams are readily explained by catastrophism, but impossible to explain by forest growth situations as geologists would have it.</p>
These flat coal seams are readily explained by catastrophism, but impossible to explain by forest growth situations as geologists would have it.
<p>A piece of wood in Slovenia. Notice that half of it has turned to coal, while the other half is still wooden. These deposits are tertiary deposits and standard geological paradigms would place them anywhere up to 40 million years old, yet this kind of coalification is even found in fence posts showing that it doesn't take millions of years to achieve this kind of coalification. Copyright Walter Veith / Amazing Discoveries</p>
A piece of wood in Slovenia. Notice that half of it has turned to coal, while the other half is still wooden. These deposits are tertiary deposits and standard geological paradigms would place them anywhere up to 40 million years old, yet this kind of coalification is even found in fence posts showing that it doesn't take millions of years to achieve this kind of coalification. Copyright Walter Veith / Amazing Discoveries
<p>This segment, written by C.R. Twidale in the <em>American Journal of Science</em>, states that there are serious problems with scientific theories of erosion and landscape development.</p>
This segment, written by C.R. Twidale in the American Journal of Science, states that there are serious problems with scientific theories of erosion and landscape development.
<p>White Cliffs of Dover These deposits are marine deposits and they are right on the top of this landscape, so this entire continent must have been underwater very recently for these to have formed.</p>
White Cliffs of Dover These deposits are marine deposits and they are right on the top of this landscape, so this entire continent must have been underwater very recently for these to have formed.
<p>Here we see coal seams embedded in the rock formations. Notice how they are perfectly flat, which does not conform to scientific thinking. Forests grow uphill and downhill, not absolutely flat. So these cannot be produced by forest situations but by washed in debris. Copyright Walter Veith / Amazing Discoveries</p>
Here we see coal seams embedded in the rock formations. Notice how they are perfectly flat, which does not conform to scientific thinking. Forests grow uphill and downhill, not absolutely flat. So these cannot be produced by forest situations but by washed in debris. Copyright Walter Veith / Amazing Discoveries
<p>Fossilized giant sloth found in the La Brea Tar Pits in California.</p>
Fossilized giant sloth found in the La Brea Tar Pits in California.
<p>Fossilized giant wolf found in the La Brea Tar Pits in California.</p>
Fossilized giant wolf found in the La Brea Tar Pits in California.
<p>Fossilized giant bison, found in the La Brea Tar Pits in California. Most of these fossils are just larger examples of present-day similar creatures. This is not evolution in progress, but regression in progress.</p>
Fossilized giant bison, found in the La Brea Tar Pits in California. Most of these fossils are just larger examples of present-day similar creatures. This is not evolution in progress, but regression in progress.
<p>Fossilized saber tooth tiger found in the La Brea Tar Pits in California.</p>
Fossilized saber tooth tiger found in the La Brea Tar Pits in California.
<p>A fossil displayed in the British Museum of Natural History. The description reads: Mammal graveyard; the fossilized remains of an antelope, gazelle, horse and carnivore are preserved in this slab. The fossils are surrounded by flood-plain deposits, suggesting that the animals were swept together by torrential floods. There is no weathering and little damage to the fossils, so they must have been buried quickly. If even the British Museum to this caption, why is it that they ignore the possibility of a universal flood?</p>
A fossil displayed in the British Museum of Natural History. The description reads: Mammal graveyard; the fossilized remains of an antelope, gazelle, horse and carnivore are preserved in this slab. The fossils are surrounded by flood-plain deposits, suggesting that the animals were swept together by torrential floods. There is no weathering and little damage to the fossils, so they must have been buried quickly. If even the British Museum to this caption, why is it that they ignore the possibility of a universal flood?
<p>Fossilized shells found in a forest in the same brown coal mines of Slovenia. Further proof that they were water deposited and could not possibly have been normal forest situations as required by modern geology.&nbsp;</p>
Fossilized shells found in a forest in the same brown coal mines of Slovenia. Further proof that they were water deposited and could not possibly have been normal forest situations as required by modern geology. 
<p>The Geological Column with fossil assemblage. The fossil sequence is standardly explained as evolution in time, but all the creatures are fully formed, highly complex creatures and in terms of their life processes, have all the complexity of any creature living today. The assemblage and order can other explanations such as ecological zonation, flotation, etc.</p>
The Geological Column with fossil assemblage. The fossil sequence is standardly explained as evolution in time, but all the creatures are fully formed, highly complex creatures and in terms of their life processes, have all the complexity of any creature living today. The assemblage and order can other explanations such as ecological zonation, flotation, etc.
<p>The La Brea Tar Pits in California. The fact that they are still bubbling means that the process of decay is not even completed, yet we are told these are millions of years old.</p>
The La Brea Tar Pits in California. The fact that they are still bubbling means that the process of decay is not even completed, yet we are told these are millions of years old.
<p>This tree was transported in the subsequent Mount St. Helen's floods many kilometres from its source showing that trees don't necessarily need to have grown where one finds them. Copyright Walter Veith / Amazing Discoveries</p>
This tree was transported in the subsequent Mount St. Helen's floods many kilometres from its source showing that trees don't necessarily need to have grown where one finds them. Copyright Walter Veith / Amazing Discoveries
<p>Malachite crystals which were formed rapidly. These authentic semi-precious stones were bought from dealers in the Congo who obviously found a way of growing them rapidly in the malachite mines by allowing the seepage to crystallize on copper wires. Note the copper wires in the broken fingers of the crystals. Formations of crystals, stone or fossils can thus be very rapid and does not require millions of years. Reports of fossilization and rapid rock formation are well known, with fossil hats having formed in mines and ships bells and bottles being encased in solid rock.</p>
Malachite crystals which were formed rapidly. These authentic semi-precious stones were bought from dealers in the Congo who obviously found a way of growing them rapidly in the malachite mines by allowing the seepage to crystallize on copper wires. Note the copper wires in the broken fingers of the crystals. Formations of crystals, stone or fossils can thus be very rapid and does not require millions of years. Reports of fossilization and rapid rock formation are well known, with fossil hats having formed in mines and ships bells and bottles being encased in solid rock.
<p>Malachite.</p>
Malachite.
<p>Petrified logs from the Mt. St. Helens eruptions float upright, providing a model for the deposition of the petrified forests of the world. If a further turbidite (underwater mud flow) were to cover these trees, they would be buried in the upright position as are the petrified forest trees in Yellowstone National Park. They would also be orientated in the direction of stream flow because tree trunks are not perfectly round.</p>
Petrified logs from the Mt. St. Helens eruptions float upright, providing a model for the deposition of the petrified forests of the world. If a further turbidite (underwater mud flow) were to cover these trees, they would be buried in the upright position as are the petrified forest trees in Yellowstone National Park. They would also be orientated in the direction of stream flow because tree trunks are not perfectly round.
<p>Deposition after the Mt. St. Helen's eruption shows a layered formation which standard geology would attribute to millions of years of deposition, however it happened in the one eruptive cycle.&nbsp;</p>
Deposition after the Mt. St. Helen's eruption shows a layered formation which standard geology would attribute to millions of years of deposition, however it happened in the one eruptive cycle. 
<p>A petrified log, uprooted by the Mt. St. Helens eruption. Its roots are ripped off and the branches and bark are stripped in the rolling and bashing caused during the flood. A typical example of how the petrified trees were transported by floods.&nbsp;</p>
A petrified log, uprooted by the Mt. St. Helens eruption. Its roots are ripped off and the branches and bark are stripped in the rolling and bashing caused during the flood. A typical example of how the petrified trees were transported by floods. 
<p>An upright petrified tree. Note that there are no roots or branches, and it stretches through various levels of strata.&nbsp;</p>
An upright petrified tree. Note that there are no roots or branches, and it stretches through various levels of strata. 
<p>Petrified upright tree in Yellowstone Park, USA. These trees have long been used as an example of stable periods of growth, since they appear to be in a position of growth. However, they are now known to have been washed into position by flooding since they are orientated in the direction of stream flow. Also they have no intact roots and the larger ones have no branches even when deeply buried showing that they were catastrophically transported from elsewhere and buried upright.&nbsp;</p>
Petrified upright tree in Yellowstone Park, USA. These trees have long been used as an example of stable periods of growth, since they appear to be in a position of growth. However, they are now known to have been washed into position by flooding since they are orientated in the direction of stream flow. Also they have no intact roots and the larger ones have no branches even when deeply buried showing that they were catastrophically transported from elsewhere and buried upright. 
<p>A petrified tree in the Petrified Forest in Namibia. The trees are stream orientated, supporting the catastrophic flood model. Similarly to other areas, the trees are stripped of their bark even when deeply buried and have no branches. Evolution explains these petrified trees as representing forest situations, but the orientation that they are water/stream depositions. This is only consistent with a universal flood.&nbsp;</p>
A petrified tree in the Petrified Forest in Namibia. The trees are stream orientated, supporting the catastrophic flood model. Similarly to other areas, the trees are stripped of their bark even when deeply buried and have no branches. Evolution explains these petrified trees as representing forest situations, but the orientation that they are water/stream depositions. This is only consistent with a universal flood. 
<p>A perfectly preserved fossil fish In order for this to have happened, there must have been rapid burial so that all decay was halted instantly. Fish decay very rapidly after death, and no such fossilization is possible without catastrophic burial.</p>
A perfectly preserved fossil fish In order for this to have happened, there must have been rapid burial so that all decay was halted instantly. Fish decay very rapidly after death, and no such fossilization is possible without catastrophic burial.
<p>Yellowstone National Park - An excavated petrified tree stump. Notice there are no roots. It cannot possibly have been buried in position of growth. It was washed in.&nbsp;</p>
Yellowstone National Park - An excavated petrified tree stump. Notice there are no roots. It cannot possibly have been buried in position of growth. It was washed in. 
<p>A petrified log in Namibia. Note that the bark is stripped and the roots are ripped off. Moreover these logs lie orientated in direction of stream flow. This is a feature common to petrified forests all over the world showing that the flood conditions were universal.&nbsp;</p>
A petrified log in Namibia. Note that the bark is stripped and the roots are ripped off. Moreover these logs lie orientated in direction of stream flow. This is a feature common to petrified forests all over the world showing that the flood conditions were universal. 
<p>Fossil sea urchins, starfish and sea lilies in a mass grave (British National Museum of Natural History.) The description given to this display states that these creatures were "buried very rapidly retaining their spines." This is consistent with the universal flood model.&nbsp;</p>
Fossil sea urchins, starfish and sea lilies in a mass grave (British National Museum of Natural History.) The description given to this display states that these creatures were "buried very rapidly retaining their spines." This is consistent with the universal flood model. 
<p>Chalk deposits (radiolaria) in brown coal mines in Slovenia. These brown coal deposits were supposedly formed in normal forest situations, however these white chalk deposits in the same layers belie that assumption. They must have formed underwater because radiolarians are marine organisms and don't belong in forests.&nbsp;</p>
Chalk deposits (radiolaria) in brown coal mines in Slovenia. These brown coal deposits were supposedly formed in normal forest situations, however these white chalk deposits in the same layers belie that assumption. They must have formed underwater because radiolarians are marine organisms and don't belong in forests. 
<p>This school of fish is on display in the British Museum of Natural History, where the explanation is given that they were trapped in a lake and dried out. However, no modern counterpart exists since the fish would decay or be eaten by scavengers. It is more likely that they were buried alive by mudflows during the flood.</p>
This school of fish is on display in the British Museum of Natural History, where the explanation is given that they were trapped in a lake and dried out. However, no modern counterpart exists since the fish would decay or be eaten by scavengers. It is more likely that they were buried alive by mudflows during the flood.
<p>All glaciers in the world are receding rapidly. In fact, so rapidly that they contradict the standard models of long ice ages which are based on linear regression rather than exponential regression. This glacier is the largest glacier in Europe situated in Iceland.&nbsp;</p>
All glaciers in the world are receding rapidly. In fact, so rapidly that they contradict the standard models of long ice ages which are based on linear regression rather than exponential regression. This glacier is the largest glacier in Europe situated in Iceland. 
<p>This giant washout and canyon in Iceland was produced in the glacial flood of 1996, so its features would normally be attributed to millions of years of erosion.&nbsp;</p>
This giant washout and canyon in Iceland was produced in the glacial flood of 1996, so its features would normally be attributed to millions of years of erosion. 
<p>The same Glacier in Iceland.&nbsp;</p>
The same Glacier in Iceland. 
<p>The Athabasca Glacier is receding at a rate that belies the theory of ice ages taking place over thousands of years. The rate at which it recedes indicates that the ice age could have taken place in less than a millennium.</p>
The Athabasca Glacier is receding at a rate that belies the theory of ice ages taking place over thousands of years. The rate at which it recedes indicates that the ice age could have taken place in less than a millennium.
<p>The 'Town Hall Formation', Cederberg in South Africa. The most likely explanation is that rapidly flowing water undercut the massive deposits, as the were uplifted after the flood. The strata must have been soft and the water must have drained into the newly forming basin before the entire structure collapsed, leaving it standing on pillars. The tunnel formation also shows the direction of stream flow.&nbsp;</p>
The 'Town Hall Formation', Cederberg in South Africa. The most likely explanation is that rapidly flowing water undercut the massive deposits, as the were uplifted after the flood. The strata must have been soft and the water must have drained into the newly forming basin before the entire structure collapsed, leaving it standing on pillars. The tunnel formation also shows the direction of stream flow. 
<p>More lava sands in Iceland.&nbsp;</p>
More lava sands in Iceland. 
<p>Markers of glacial recession show that it is much more rapid than originally thought and the time required for an Ice Age may be centuries away rather than thousands of years. The time for glacial recession is much shorter than originally postulated.&nbsp;</p>
Markers of glacial recession show that it is much more rapid than originally thought and the time required for an Ice Age may be centuries away rather than thousands of years. The time for glacial recession is much shorter than originally postulated. 
<p>Floods caused by the eruption of Mt. St. Helens tore trees from the ground, and gathered them into lakes after the second eruption. If there had been a further mud flow, these logs would have been buried in the direction of stream flow as are the horizontal logs in petrified forests.</p>
Floods caused by the eruption of Mt. St. Helens tore trees from the ground, and gathered them into lakes after the second eruption. If there had been a further mud flow, these logs would have been buried in the direction of stream flow as are the horizontal logs in petrified forests.
<p>Sheets of volcanic material in Washington State, USA. Evidence for volcanism in the form of lava is largely a surface phenomenon which shows that it is a relatively young occurrence. Yet volcanism should have theoretically been a part of the earth's formative cycle since its inception. Volcanism in lower geological strata is in the form of 'brecsia' which means that it is water deposition again consistent with the universal flood.</p>
Sheets of volcanic material in Washington State, USA. Evidence for volcanism in the form of lava is largely a surface phenomenon which shows that it is a relatively young occurrence. Yet volcanism should have theoretically been a part of the earth's formative cycle since its inception. Volcanism in lower geological strata is in the form of 'brecsia' which means that it is water deposition again consistent with the universal flood.
<p>A donga (rapid water erosion from rainstorms). This feature formed after one rainstorm and provides a mini-scale for the canyons of the world. Even the topographical features resemble on a small-scale those found in the larger canyons of the world.&nbsp;</p>
A donga (rapid water erosion from rainstorms). This feature formed after one rainstorm and provides a mini-scale for the canyons of the world. Even the topographical features resemble on a small-scale those found in the larger canyons of the world. 
<p>If layers of strata were deposited rapidly, then this would suggest that they were still soft when uplifted to form continents. During continent and mountain up-lift, these layers would fold because they had not yet turned to rock. This folding can be seen here, in the Alps.</p>
If layers of strata were deposited rapidly, then this would suggest that they were still soft when uplifted to form continents. During continent and mountain up-lift, these layers would fold because they had not yet turned to rock. This folding can be seen here, in the Alps.
<p>In the center of this picture is an arch. Features like this can best be explained by catastrophic formation, subsequent hardening, and removal of debris by water since natural erosional features would not work from the bottom up but from the top down.&nbsp;</p>
In the center of this picture is an arch. Features like this can best be explained by catastrophic formation, subsequent hardening, and removal of debris by water since natural erosional features would not work from the bottom up but from the top down. 
<p><em>Beartooth Butte matches the same layers located much lower down in Bighorn Basin. How could the solid rock above the Precambrian rock warp upward during the upthrust if in fact it was solid&mdash;taking millions of years to form? A more logical explanation seems to be that the layers were not solid and in fact were recently and rapidly formed just before a very rapid upthrust of the Precambrian under the Beartooth Butte location. The water, which laid down these sedimentary layers, rapidly rushed off of the upthrusted area. This rapid runoff of water quickly eroded the area leaving only Beartooth Butte standing to dry as the water receded. </em><a href="http://www.detectingdesign.com/geologiccolumn.html">Read the whole article by Sean Pitman, MD</a>.</p>
Beartooth Butte matches the same layers located much lower down in Bighorn Basin. How could the solid rock above the Precambrian rock warp upward during the upthrust if in fact it was solid—taking millions of years to form? A more logical explanation seems to be that the layers were not solid and in fact were recently and rapidly formed just before a very rapid upthrust of the Precambrian under the Beartooth Butte location. The water, which laid down these sedimentary layers, rapidly rushed off of the upthrusted area. This rapid runoff of water quickly eroded the area leaving only Beartooth Butte standing to dry as the water receded. Read the whole article by Sean Pitman, MD.
<p>More erosional features off the coast of Australia.&nbsp;</p>
More erosional features off the coast of Australia. 
<p>This is Beartooth Butte which sites elevated on top of a mountain ridge in Wyoming, above its associated layers. How was it raised up to this height according to standard geological thinking? It must have been thrusted, moved uphill over eons of time without leaving a trace of any such movement. The surrounding layers were apparently weathered away over time, leaving Beartooth Butte as a lone formation. But another explanation is more plausible as shown in the next diagram.</p>
This is Beartooth Butte which sites elevated on top of a mountain ridge in Wyoming, above its associated layers. How was it raised up to this height according to standard geological thinking? It must have been thrusted, moved uphill over eons of time without leaving a trace of any such movement. The surrounding layers were apparently weathered away over time, leaving Beartooth Butte as a lone formation. But another explanation is more plausible as shown in the next diagram.
<p>A clastic intrusion from the Kodachrome basin, USA. Mingling of layers can be seen which is further confirmation of soft layers.</p>
A clastic intrusion from the Kodachrome basin, USA. Mingling of layers can be seen which is further confirmation of soft layers.
<p>A clastic intrusion from the Kodachrome basin, USA. These pillars of stone were thrust up through the underlying strata and are evidence that all the layers must have been soft mud of liquid consistency as would be expected in flood deposits.</p>
A clastic intrusion from the Kodachrome basin, USA. These pillars of stone were thrust up through the underlying strata and are evidence that all the layers must have been soft mud of liquid consistency as would be expected in flood deposits.
<p>The Biblical timeline of the Flood.</p>
The Biblical timeline of the Flood.
<p>Raised turbidites found in Texas, USA.These turbidites were obviously deposited horizontally but have subsequently been uplifted to the vertical position.&nbsp;</p>
Raised turbidites found in Texas, USA.These turbidites were obviously deposited horizontally but have subsequently been uplifted to the vertical position. 
<p>Neo-Assyrian clay tablet known as the "Flood Tablet." Epic of Gilgamesh, Tablet 11: Story of the Flood. This tablet tells just one of the many worldwide Flood stories.</p>
Neo-Assyrian clay tablet known as the "Flood Tablet." Epic of Gilgamesh, Tablet 11: Story of the Flood. This tablet tells just one of the many worldwide Flood stories.
<p>Erosion relics in the USA indicate rapid erosion of the strata between them. These 2 pillar-like structures survived the erosion of all the strata in between? Impossible. Only a rapid washout can leave such relics as can be found in modern catastrophic flood washouts. The water is gone before all the material is removed.&nbsp;</p>
Erosion relics in the USA indicate rapid erosion of the strata between them. These 2 pillar-like structures survived the erosion of all the strata in between? Impossible. Only a rapid washout can leave such relics as can be found in modern catastrophic flood washouts. The water is gone before all the material is removed. 
<p>The Fish River in Namibia shows evidence of rapid washout which shows that the conditions were universal.&nbsp;</p>
The Fish River in Namibia shows evidence of rapid washout which shows that the conditions were universal. 
<p>The top layer is subject to erosion and shows it being very uneven and worn. The layers underneath have flat surface contacts and were therefore not subject to erosion. These are turbidites rapidly deposited on top of one another. <br /><br />In the picture on the right, we see evidence of massive water erosion but before the deposit could be washed away, the water subsided&mdash;typical of a flood deposit.&nbsp;</p>
The top layer is subject to erosion and shows it being very uneven and worn. The layers underneath have flat surface contacts and were therefore not subject to erosion. These are turbidites rapidly deposited on top of one another. In the picture on the right, we see evidence of massive water erosion but before the deposit could be washed away, the water subsided—typical of a flood deposit. 
<p>This rock formation again shows that the top layer exposed to erosions does not look like the middle or lower layers which have flat contacts and were therefore never exposed to erosion, or else they would look like the top layer. The idea that the flat contact layers within formations were ever once the surface of the earth for millions of years is completely absurd.&nbsp;</p>
This rock formation again shows that the top layer exposed to erosions does not look like the middle or lower layers which have flat contacts and were therefore never exposed to erosion, or else they would look like the top layer. The idea that the flat contact layers within formations were ever once the surface of the earth for millions of years is completely absurd. 
<p>The Goosenecks in the Colorado River show evidence of rapid washout in view of the V-shape even around bends where under standard deposition you would have undercut on one side and deposition on the other, so this can only be rapid washout.&nbsp;</p>
The Goosenecks in the Colorado River show evidence of rapid washout in view of the V-shape even around bends where under standard deposition you would have undercut on one side and deposition on the other, so this can only be rapid washout. 
<p>A rock formation from the Cedarberg mountain range in South Africa. Again we see erosional features on the top layer but only flat contact layers showing that there was no erosion on the lower layers, disputing the theory that those layers were once the surface of the earth.&nbsp;</p>
A rock formation from the Cedarberg mountain range in South Africa. Again we see erosional features on the top layer but only flat contact layers showing that there was no erosion on the lower layers, disputing the theory that those layers were once the surface of the earth. 
<p>Another unconformity between a shale and a sandstone with no evidence whatsoever of any layer in between. Therefore, the time in question does not exist.&nbsp;</p>
Another unconformity between a shale and a sandstone with no evidence whatsoever of any layer in between. Therefore, the time in question does not exist. 
<p>These incredibly flat contacts are all in areas of unconformities (assume layers missing) leaving no evidence of having been eliminated by erosion. Obviously they never existed.&nbsp;</p>
These incredibly flat contacts are all in areas of unconformities (assume layers missing) leaving no evidence of having been eliminated by erosion. Obviously they never existed. 
<p>The Grand Canyon. Each layer supposedly represents a time when that layer was the surface of the earth. However, there is no evidence of erosion between layers as can be seen by flat contact of layers. Between some layers unconformities exist, meaning some layers are missing, meaning that there is time missing, according to standard geological interpretation. Geologists claim that the layers were eroded away before new layers were deposited, yet there is no evidence of this erosion because the contacts are still absolutely flat.&nbsp;</p>
The Grand Canyon. Each layer supposedly represents a time when that layer was the surface of the earth. However, there is no evidence of erosion between layers as can be seen by flat contact of layers. Between some layers unconformities exist, meaning some layers are missing, meaning that there is time missing, according to standard geological interpretation. Geologists claim that the layers were eroded away before new layers were deposited, yet there is no evidence of this erosion because the contacts are still absolutely flat. 
<p>Monument Valley is again another example of rapid washout of the material. The water was gone before all the material could be eradicated leaving these amazing relics.&nbsp;</p>
Monument Valley is again another example of rapid washout of the material. The water was gone before all the material could be eradicated leaving these amazing relics. 
<p>A load cast and a flame between two layers of strata in the Grand Canyon. Here, material from the bottom layer is whipped into the top layer, suggesting that both layers were soft at the time of formation and is also strong evidence of catastrophic deposition.</p>
A load cast and a flame between two layers of strata in the Grand Canyon. Here, material from the bottom layer is whipped into the top layer, suggesting that both layers were soft at the time of formation and is also strong evidence of catastrophic deposition.
<p>A desert dune in USA. Scientists claimed it had always been desert, but after a long period of analysis, they determined that it was formed underwater. The angle of deposition and the grain size proves that these deposits are also underwater deposits and not desert dune systems as previously assumed. In order to have a normal topography, scientists have to assume arid eras in the geological column but modern science belies these theories.&nbsp;</p>
A desert dune in USA. Scientists claimed it had always been desert, but after a long period of analysis, they determined that it was formed underwater. The angle of deposition and the grain size proves that these deposits are also underwater deposits and not desert dune systems as previously assumed. In order to have a normal topography, scientists have to assume arid eras in the geological column but modern science belies these theories. 
<p>The Navaho Twins indicate rapid erosion between the two relics. As in the previous picture, we see the same evidence in a different area.&nbsp;</p>
The Navaho Twins indicate rapid erosion between the two relics. As in the previous picture, we see the same evidence in a different area. 
<p>The Grand Canyon. Here we see massive amounts of land and rock have been removed. Did the little Colorado River really carve out this canyon over millions of years, or is there a more sensible explanation? The Grand Canyon runs through an uplifted area which could not have been washed out by the river incrementally because rivers do not run over uplifted areas (ie. uphill), so this was a fast uplift with flood waters rushing through a crack which appeared in the uplift washing out the entire canyon rapidly.&nbsp;</p>
The Grand Canyon. Here we see massive amounts of land and rock have been removed. Did the little Colorado River really carve out this canyon over millions of years, or is there a more sensible explanation? The Grand Canyon runs through an uplifted area which could not have been washed out by the river incrementally because rivers do not run over uplifted areas (ie. uphill), so this was a fast uplift with flood waters rushing through a crack which appeared in the uplift washing out the entire canyon rapidly. 
<p>A stalagmite that formed when water rich in calcium carbonate was pumped into a city.This took only months to form yet scientists claim that stalagmites take millions of years to form.&nbsp;</p>
A stalagmite that formed when water rich in calcium carbonate was pumped into a city.This took only months to form yet scientists claim that stalagmites take millions of years to form. 
<p>A turbidite flame in a petrified forest showing that these forests were deposited as water depositions. They are therefore washed in.</p>
A turbidite flame in a petrified forest showing that these forests were deposited as water depositions. They are therefore washed in.
<p>A turbidite in New Zealand. Notice the coarse to fine deposition. The heavier larger material at the base and the finer material on the top. This again is only possible in a rapid water deposition and does not allow for considerable time periods. It is also consistent with the universal flood.&nbsp;</p>
A turbidite in New Zealand. Notice the coarse to fine deposition. The heavier larger material at the base and the finer material on the top. This again is only possible in a rapid water deposition and does not allow for considerable time periods. It is also consistent with the universal flood. 
<p>A "water whirl." Water sucked out this unique feature while this rock was still pliable. This could not have happened if the rock was hard or over millions of years. Moreover, the rocks cannot be millions of years old for these features would have been eradicated long ago. Taken at Augrabies Falls, South Africa.&nbsp;</p>
A "water whirl." Water sucked out this unique feature while this rock was still pliable. This could not have happened if the rock was hard or over millions of years. Moreover, the rocks cannot be millions of years old for these features would have been eradicated long ago. Taken at Augrabies Falls, South Africa. 
<p>A "water whirl." Another example of water suction of soft pliable material. This was found at Augrabies Falls in South Africa. Some people say a stone swirling around in a depression will also create the same feature. This is however not possible since the features do not show any signs of abrasion by stone.&nbsp;</p>
A "water whirl." Another example of water suction of soft pliable material. This was found at Augrabies Falls in South Africa. Some people say a stone swirling around in a depression will also create the same feature. This is however not possible since the features do not show any signs of abrasion by stone. 
<p>Beautiful erosional features in Bryce Canyon. This is an example of deep channeling by rapid washout and subsequent weathering over time.</p>
Beautiful erosional features in Bryce Canyon. This is an example of deep channeling by rapid washout and subsequent weathering over time.
<p>Here again rapid erosion must have removed all the material surrounding these features in Bryce Canyon. If these were subject to millions of years of erosion, then why were these so stubborn as to refuse to move?&nbsp;</p>
Here again rapid erosion must have removed all the material surrounding these features in Bryce Canyon. If these were subject to millions of years of erosion, then why were these so stubborn as to refuse to move? 
<p>Signs of rapid erosion in Zion Canyon. Such deep channeling through uplifted mountain areas could only have been achieved by rapid washout of still soft material post-flood.&nbsp;</p>
Signs of rapid erosion in Zion Canyon. Such deep channeling through uplifted mountain areas could only have been achieved by rapid washout of still soft material post-flood. 
<p>The Three Sisters in Karoo, South Africa. The fact that features such as these are on every single continent shows that there was a universal flood. If erosion is constantly happening, these features should also have eroded.&nbsp;</p>
The Three Sisters in Karoo, South Africa. The fact that features such as these are on every single continent shows that there was a universal flood. If erosion is constantly happening, these features should also have eroded. 
<p>A load cast between two layers of strata in the Grand Canyon. Here, material from the upper layer is pushed into the underlying layer. This could only have been possible if the material was soft.&nbsp;</p>
A load cast between two layers of strata in the Grand Canyon. Here, material from the upper layer is pushed into the underlying layer. This could only have been possible if the material was soft. 
<p>If layers of strata were deposited rapidly, then this would suggest that these features were still soft when uplifted to form continents. During continent and mountain up-lift, these layers would fold because they had not yet turned to rock. This folding can be seen here, in the Swartberg range in South Africa.</p>
If layers of strata were deposited rapidly, then this would suggest that these features were still soft when uplifted to form continents. During continent and mountain up-lift, these layers would fold because they had not yet turned to rock. This folding can be seen here, in the Swartberg range in South Africa.
<p>Turbidites from New Zealand. We can see that the material is graded from course to fine, showing these deposits were laid down rapidly underwater then uplifted later.</p>
Turbidites from New Zealand. We can see that the material is graded from course to fine, showing these deposits were laid down rapidly underwater then uplifted later.
<p>Turbidites from Texas, USA. These massive deposits were laid down rapidly and later uplifted when the layers were soft. They could not have formed over millions of years.</p>
Turbidites from Texas, USA. These massive deposits were laid down rapidly and later uplifted when the layers were soft. They could not have formed over millions of years.
<p>This sign at the Grand Canyon shows an unconformity, where an entire layer of rock has been completely eroded between two other layers. Since these missing layers occur in other regions in the US and are associated with time, these layers are assumed to have been present here, but since you cannot eradicate time, you have to eradicate the layer by erosion and that without a trace. A better solution to the problem is that the deposits which occur elsewhere indicate that the material which comprises the missing layers was less than in other areas and when deposited just did not reach as far as the Grand Canyon thus leaving a gap.</p>
This sign at the Grand Canyon shows an unconformity, where an entire layer of rock has been completely eroded between two other layers. Since these missing layers occur in other regions in the US and are associated with time, these layers are assumed to have been present here, but since you cannot eradicate time, you have to eradicate the layer by erosion and that without a trace. A better solution to the problem is that the deposits which occur elsewhere indicate that the material which comprises the missing layers was less than in other areas and when deposited just did not reach as far as the Grand Canyon thus leaving a gap.
<p>A "water whirl." Water sucked this feature out while the rock was still pliable. This would not happen to hardened rock. Taken at Augrabies Falls, South Africa.&nbsp;</p>
A "water whirl." Water sucked this feature out while the rock was still pliable. This would not happen to hardened rock. Taken at Augrabies Falls, South Africa. 
<p>The Orange River Canyon. Notice the distinct v-shape. V-shapes are indicative of rapid washout particularly if the V-shape is maintained even around corners because slow erosion would deposit material to one side and undercut on the other side, not allowing for a V-shape.&nbsp;</p>
The Orange River Canyon. Notice the distinct v-shape. V-shapes are indicative of rapid washout particularly if the V-shape is maintained even around corners because slow erosion would deposit material to one side and undercut on the other side, not allowing for a V-shape.